andre and the weather

doubleentandre:

Also there are like clouds in the sky today? Which is only weird because I’m pretty sure there hasn’t been a cloudy day here in 3 months

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do-raymi:

Shoutout to that one go-to outfit in my closet that makes me look like less of a potato

(via biancamoreno2010)

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11th
September
 
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11th
September
hypsterblog:

Watch Janelle Monae kill it on Sesame Street. Adorable. 

hypsterblog:

Watch Janelle Monae kill it on Sesame Street. Adorable. 

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Simple and Clean is truly magical because never before has a song made me so emotional while making the least amount of sense imaginable

(via scottyyy77)

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houseofmind:

Neural Basis of Prejudice and Stereotyping

As social beings, humans have the capacity to make quick evaluations that allow for discernment of in-groups (us) and out-groups (them). However, these fast computations also set the stage for social categorizations, including prejudice and stereotyping.

According to David Amodio, author of the review I am summarizing: 

Social prejudices are scaffolded by basic-level neurocognitive structures, but their expression is guided by personal goals and normative expectations, played out in dyadic and intergroup settings; this is truly the human brain in vivo.

But what is the role of the brain in prejudice and stereotypes? First, let’s start by defining and distinguishing between the two: 

Prejudice refers to preconceptions — often negative — about groups or individuals based on their social, racial or ethnic affiliations whereas stereotypes are generalized characteristics ascribed to a social group, such as personal traits or circumstantial attributes. However, these two are rarely solo operators and are often work in combination to influence social behavior. 

Research on the neural basis of prejudice has placed emphasis on brain areas implicated in emotion and motivation. These include the amygdala, insula, striatum and regions of the prefrontal cortex (see top figure). Speficifically, the amygdala is involved in the rapid processing of social category cues, including racial groups, in terms of potential threat or reward. The striatum mediates approach-related instrumental responses while the insula, an area implicated in disgust, supports visceral and subjective emotional responses towards social ingroups or outgroups. Affect-driven judgements of social outgroup members rely on the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and may be characterized by reduced activity in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in empathy and mentalizing. Together, these structures are thought to form a core network that underlies the experience and expression of prejudice. 

In contrast to prejudice, which reflects an evaluative or emotional component of social bias, stereotypes represent the cognitive component. As such, stereotyping is a little more complex because it involves the encoding and storage of stereotype concepts, the selection and activation of these concepts into working memory and their application in judgements and behaviors. When it comes to social judgments, I find it useful to think of prejudice as a low road, and stereotypes as a high road (which recruits higher order cortical areas). For example, stereotyping involves cortical structures supporting more general forms of semantic memory, object memory, retrieval and conceptual activation, such as the temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), as well as regions that are involved in impression formation, like the mPFC (see bottom figure).

Importantly, although prejudice and stereotyping share an overlapping neural circuitry, they are considered as different and dissociable networks. Also, it is important to remember that areas such as the mPFC, include many subdivisions that may contribute to different aspects of the network. This is important because these within structure subdivisions are usually not readily identifiable in neuroimaging studies. Anyway, if you want to learn more about the specifics of these network and obtain real world examples of these networks at work, read the full review article (see below). 

Source:

Amodio, D.  (2014). The neuroscience of prejudice and stereotyping. Nature Reviews Neurociencedoi: 10.1038/nrn3800

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prguitarman:

I want to believe

(via l0stinmyminddd)

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"Chris [Pratt] never uses a spit bucket. When you do scenes where a character is eating, you eat and then spit it out into a ‘spit bucket.’ Chris just keeps eating. If you see Andy eating a cheeseburger in a scene, you should know Chris Pratt ate like 8 cheeseburgers. I love that guy."

Aziz Ansari  (via stankley)

(via doubleentandre)

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08th
September
museum-of-artifacts:

German universal tool. Nuremberg, about 1560’s

museum-of-artifacts:

German universal tool. Nuremberg, about 1560’s

(via greyheadphones)

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08th
September
fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Conchita Montenegro, spanish actress, model and dancer.

fuckyeahmodernflapper:

Conchita Montenegro, spanish actress, model and dancer.

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hulu probs.

doubleentandre:

mariyellow:

I’m messing up Andre’s hulu account by watching hella project runway and sailor moon crystal and masterchef

doubleentandre

This is what my generosity gets me

image

TO BE FAIR:

I DO NOT WATCH THAT HARRY CRAP OR THAT NICK MOM CRAP. JUST VAMPIRE DIARIES CRAP. OK?! 

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newyorker:

Remembering Joan Rivers, in today’s daily cartoon.

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